Education Bill impacts barring decisions

January 27, 2011 7:14 pm

Several elements of  the new Education Bill will impact safeguarding in schools.   In particular, it paves the way for reduced school inspections and the granting of anonymity to teachers who have been accused of misconduct by pupils.  Also the Secretary of State will keep a list of people barred from teaching and that “this must be available for inspection by the public”.  Further details are available here and the full explanatory notes here.

Previously, Ofsted inspectors measured schools in 27 categories but that is being reduced to four: pupil achievement, quality of teaching, leadership and management and the behaviour and safety of pupils.  Furthermore the Bill exempts outstanding schools from routine Ofsted inspections – meaning one in five of England’s schools will not be inspected unless problems are reported.

The legislation will also transfer key responsibilities to the Secretary of State for Education.  These were previously held by five quangos which are being abolished, including teacher training.  This also includes the power to investigate allegations of misconduct by teachers and to ban them – work previously done by the General Teaching Council for England.

The Bill also says the secretary of state will keep a list of people barred from teaching and that “this must be available for inspection by the public”